Tag Archives: reconstructive surgery

Share Your Story: Dina Sabra (Part 2/2)

Within 10 days of being diagnosed with DCIS breast cancer, Dina Sabra was off to Lenox Hill Long Island Jewish Hospital in the Upper East Side for a bilateral mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. Despite Dina’s Canadian citizenship and lack of insurance in the US, she chose to undergo her operation in the States because she would be treated much quicker as a patient paying out-of-pocket. Initially, the hospital wanted to keep Dina around for a few months before her operation, but they ended up being able to schedule her in three and a half weeks after her arrival. “I guess …

 

Share Your Story: Dina Sabra (Part 1/2)

“In my mind, it was always a matter of, not if but, when,” said Dina Sabra, Canadian-Egyptian breast cancer survivor. With breast cancer making an appearance in her maternal family history for over three consecutive generations, Dina knew breast cancer would be an unwelcome visitor in her life one day; however, she didn’t expect the visit to come so soon. Dina’s grandmother, mother and aunt all battled breast cancer post-menopause, prompting Dina’s shock when her battle came at age 36. 
As a result of her family’s relationship with breast cancer, Dina routinely visited a breast specialist in Dubai, UAE, where she, …

 

Choosing Breast Reconstruction

Choosing breast reconstruction  is a choice that not every woman is prepared to make soon after after a diagnosis of breast cancer.
Women opting to have reconstruction need to have a detailed discussion with their surgeons with regard to the risks and benefits of reconstruction. They need to understand that if they are considering reconstruction to maintain their body image that the reconstructed breast will not look exactly like their natural breast.
Women need to know that:

A reconstructed breast will not have the same sensation and feel as the breast it replaces.
Visible incision lines will always be present on the breast, whether …

 

PAINT THE TOWN PINK: Brenda Pignone: ‘I am blessed to be here’

Wicked Local Abington
Posted Oct 17, 2010
Seven year ago July 8, 2003 on what was planned to be a day shopping with my then 13-year-old daughter became a day that stopped me in my tracks and cemented the meaning of “your life can change forever in one moment.”
Sara and I took the train to Boston and I told her that I needed to stop at Mass General Hospital to “quickly have my mammogram” and then we could head out for a day of shopping and lunch. The radiologist suggested that the mammogram showed an area of calcifications and that she would like …

 

Framingham woman with breast cancer has her baby

By Danielle Ameden/Daily News staff
GateHouse News Service
The past:
After a four-year struggle to get pregnant, Framingham residents Rebecca and Larry Byrne found out in early January that they were finally expecting a baby, thanks to a successful in vitro fertilization procedure. In March, though, Rebecca was diagnosed with invasive ductile carcinoma, a type of breast cancer. Despite one doctor’s recommendation to abort, the couple decided to keep the baby while Rebecca, 35, underwent two surgeries and started chemotherapy for her breast cancer. She told her story at myboobandmybaby.blogspot.com.
The recent present:
Rebecca’s water broke early – at 33 weeks – and she delivered …

 

Survivor Spotlight A doctor faces breast cancer – and her fears

by Debra Bradley Ruder
Physician, researcher, mom … and cancer survivor, Karen Puopolo, MD, PhD.

Toward the end of her fourth pregnancy, Karen Puopolo, MD, PhD, realized something was not normal with her left breast. There was a lump, but Puopolo figured it was a blocked duct or something else related to her pregnancy. Both her breast-feeding consultant and OB/GYN assured her not to worry, and Puopolo – herself a physician and researcher – opted to “wait and see.”
But when her daughter Elizabeth Chloe was about nine …

 

Michael Johnston Spreading the word for men with breast cancer

A woman noticed the front of Michael Johnston’s T-shirt as he got on the Dana building elevator, and smiled.
“Very cute,” she said upon noting the credo “Real Men Wear Pink” across his chest.
Johnston returned the grin, and then surprised the woman by pointing at his chest and replying:
“I only fill it out half-way, you know — really.”
It’s that unique circumstance that has Johnston visiting Dana-Farber these days: breast cancer treatment.

Tags: Beth Overmover, breast cancer warning signs, Dana-Farber, Faulkner Hospital, lumpectomy, male breast cancer, mammogram, mastectomy, MD, Michael Johnston, radiation, reconstructive surgery